posts

australiangreatwarpoetry.blogspot.com

 

I was born and raised in Sydney, Australia. I have always been interested in Australians at war, so it was only natural that I would go on to study this subject. So, I am currently studying for a PhD in English Literature, specialising in Australian Great War poetry.
 It is my hope that readers of this page will both enjoy it and contribute to it. The blog, as with the facebook page, is all about collecting information about Australians who wrote poetry during the Great War of 1914 to 1918. These may be men or women; serving soldiers and nurses or non-service men and women. They may even be children. It is all about the Australian poetic voice. The blog and facebook page will hopefully create a data base of these remarkable people so that more may be known about them. The world seems to know about Wildfred Owen and Siegfried Sassoon, but does the world know about Leon Gillert and Frank E. Westbrook? Owen and Sassoon are both remarkable poets, but so are Gillert and Westbrook. Both this blog and the facebook page will post poems, biographies and pictures. I truly hope you enjoy it.

Best wishes,
D.P.G. Sheridan

http://uk.pinterest.com/dominicsheridan/ https://www.facebook.com/australianwarpoetry?ref=aymt_homepage_panel

Red Bull Rising: Poetry Book Review: ‘The Ghosts of Babylon’

Source: Red Bull Rising: Poetry Book Review: ‘The Ghosts of Babylon’

In his 2016 collection “The Ghosts of Babylon”  (Blackside Publishing),  former U.S. army  Airborne Ranger and private military contractor Jonathan Baxter has produced a sublimely profane work of war poetry, one that is full of soldierly humor and gritty experience.

 

 

 

Unheard Voices: The Poetry of the Gallipoli Campaign – University of Leeds

“Unheard Voices: British, Anzac, and Turkish Poetry of the Gallipoli Campaign” is a one-day conference funded by the AHRC-funded Gateways to the First World War Public Engagement Centre. “Unheard Voices” is organised by the University of Leeds in partnership with Leeds City Museums and Galleries.

The conference will host a number of presentations concerning literary, cultural, and historical aspects of the Campaign as well as an evening event with acclaimed poet, writer, and broadcaster Ian McMillan.

 

 

Unheard Voices: The Poetry of the Gallipoli Campaign – University of Leeds

Here’s Why Denis Johnson Was the Last Truly Great Gonzo War Correspondent

His first foray to a war zone came in the early ‘80s. Already seen as a promising, up-and-coming poet and novelist, Johnson could have ridden his reputation into a comfortable teaching gig Stateside. Instead he bounced down to Nicaragua to cover the fighting between the Sandinistas and the Contras, an experience he would later parlay into his excellent third novel The Stars at Noon.

Source: Here’s Why Denis Johnson Was the Last Truly Great Gonzo War Correspondent

Out of military turmoil, ‘Cry Havoc’ delivers visceral poetry – Houston Chronicle

Stephan Wolfert’s “Cry Havoc!,” being staged now by the 4th Wall Theatre Company, is billed as a one-man show about PTSD viewed through the lens of war plays like “Hamlet,” “Henry V” and “Richard III,” but here’s the rub: Most one-man shows and plays that try to connect literature with “issues” fail. They are almost always better in concept than in practice. Wolfert’s show is intriguing in concept and exhilarating in practice. Developed over the course of a lifetime, this autobiographical piece is an emotional, intellectual and political wallop.

Source: Out of military turmoil, ‘Cry Havoc’ delivers visceral poetry – Houston Chronicle

O-Dark-Thirty

O-Dark-Thirty is the literary journal of the Veterans Writing Project. Launched in May of 2012, it is a platform for veterans and members of the military community to share their writing with a broad community of interested readers.

The core of our work is The Report. It’s where the majority of our writing lives; it features fiction, non-fiction, and poetry that is only lightly edited by our editors.

Source: O-Dark-Thirty

The Great Vietnam War Novel Was Not Written by an American – The New York Times

Source: The Great Vietnam War Novel Was Not Written by an American – The New York TimesT

 

This is a very good review of the literature of the war written by Vietnamese – Americans. He points out that the suffering of many of these people was greater than that of American soldiers in Vietnam, many of whom never saw or felt combat.

British women writing about war, 1910-1960

‘This list includes brilliant novelists, trailblazing journalists, and entertaining genre writers, authors who explored the depths of war’s despair and those who strived cheerfully to maintain morale and lift the spirits, and they are an amazing group of women, many of whom deserve more attention than they’ve received. Even as we honor all of the men and women who have served in military posts (and some of the women listed here did that as well), I think it’s also appropriate to remember and honor those who performed the service of documenting the realities of wartime life’—

http://furrowedmiddlebrow.blogspot.co.uk/2014/11/the-war-list-c.html

 

 

 

Human Costs of the Forever Wars, Enough to Fill a Bookshelf – Dec 2014 -The New York Times

“All war literature, across the centuries, bears witness to certain eternal truths: the death and chaos encountered, minute by minute; the bonds of love and loyalty among soldiers; the bad dreams and worse anxieties that afflict many of those lucky enough to return home. And today’s emerging literature… both reverberates with those timeless experiences and is imprinted with the particularities of the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq: changes in technology, the increased presence of female soldiers and, most importantly, the all-volunteer military, which has opened a chasm between soldiers (“the other 1 percent”) and civilians.”

 

Source: Human Costs of the Forever Wars, Enough to Fill a Bookshelf – The New York Times